Yearly Archives: 2011

A privacy paradox: Social networking in the United States

In this article, based on a classroom attitudinal survey of 65 American undergraduates, Barnes identifies the “privacy paradox,” a concept that framed much of the early, youth-focused privacy research on SNS. The privacy paradox is based on the perceived difference … Continue reading

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Deep packet inspection: Its nature and implications

In this essay, prepared for the Privacy Commissioner of Canada, Clarke outlines the technical characteristics of DPI and its welcome and unwelcome uses. Technically, DPI transforms intermediary nodes in a network—nodes needed to forward packets to their destinations—into sites that … Continue reading

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ISP traffic management technologies: The state of the art

ISPs have traditionally over-provisioned sections of their network to enable a high quality of service during times of high network usage. With the growth of over-the-top services (e.g. Hulu, YouTube, Netflix) and widespread uploading of content, ISP networks threaten to … Continue reading

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The cost of (anti-)social networks: Identity, agency and neo-luddites

Writing during the heyday of generally unreflective excitement about the revolutionary potential of the internet and “Web 2.0,” Bigge provides one of the first academic critiques of SNS. He presents a nuanced argument for an alternative perspective on SNS that … Continue reading

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The master switch: The rise and fall of information empires

Will the Internet remain open or will corporate and government interests change its character as with previous communication mediums? This question underlies The Master Switch. Wu traces the history of radio networks, the telephone, broadcast TV, and Hollywood to argue … Continue reading

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Collective information practice: Exploring privacy and security as social and cultural phenomena

Dourish and Anderson provide a comprehensive overview of HCI perspectives on privacy and security (in other words, understanding privacy and security in terms of how people interact with computers). They also provide an examination of the three approaches used to … Continue reading

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Privacy in an Overexposed World

Through case studies and examples from Facebook and the physical world, Solove provides a useful summary of US privacy law and its shortcomings in the age of DMS and SNS. He particularly focuses on the notion of privacy in public, … Continue reading

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Deep packet inspection and Internet censorship

Many concerns about DPI relate to commercial applications of the technology, but Wagner argues that we should focus on how governments use the technology to promote widespread censorship. Being transparent about DPI’s use might be a sufficient means to protect … Continue reading

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Online social networking as participatory surveillance

In this theoretically grounded paper, which draws on surveillance studies and computer ethics (specifically Andrejevic’s (2005) notion of lateral surveillance, see above), Albrechtslund argues that given their characteristics (sharing of activities, preferences and beliefs to socialize) SNS are anchored in … Continue reading

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Disclosure, deception and deep packet inspection: The role of the Federal Trade Commission Act’s Deceptive Conduct Prohibitions in the net neutrality debate

American ISPs have deployed technologies like DPI since being relieved of common carrier provisions in 2005. Sandoval argues that customers cannot understand what might negatively impact their Internet service, ISPs demonstrate limited technical and policy transparency, and little consumer awareness … Continue reading

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